Sewing News

The Latest news in Sewing
Sewing up a mouth isn't like stitching a pair of pants back ... It's the same pressure that nearly broke my friend and what I worry most about my girlfriend entering the industry. But there is also comfort to be found in A Mortician's Tale. [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Industry News
Sewing up a mouth isn't like stitching a pair of pants back ... It's the same pressure that nearly broke my friend and what I worry most about my girlfriend entering the industry. But there is also comfort to be found in A Mortician's Tale. [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Industry News
This Sewing Kit with 136 pieces is only $11.84 (70% off) with this Lightning Deal at Amazon right now! I actually bought this same sewing kit during a previous lightning deal and I highly recommend it! It has tons of items and the zipper case is great to ... [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
This Sewing Kit with 136 pieces is only $11.84 (70% off) with this Lightning Deal at Amazon right now! I actually bought this same sewing kit during a previous lightning deal and I highly recommend it! It has tons of items and the zipper case is great to ... [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
This Sewing Kit with 136 pieces is only $11.84 (70% off) with this Lightning Deal at Amazon right now! I actually bought this same sewing kit during a previous lightning deal and I highly recommend it! It has tons of items and the zipper case is great to ... [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
The last large-scale study on quilting in the United States surfaced 16.4 million quilters and a $3.76 billion industry. The DC Modern Quilt ... still here with us,” Bouri shared on Instagram. “Sewing is always going to be a part of what I do—quilts ... [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Industry News
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
My mother and I used to collect vintage sewing (and knitting) patterns. We'd scour old haberdashery shops, charity shops and boot sales for them. Mum's collection started before I was born (before the Cold War! that's all you're getting from me about my age! [...]
Sun, Oct 22, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
For as long as I can remember, I've been sewing buttons back onto shirts for my dad and three brothers. It used to be easy when we lived in the same house. But as us kids have grown up and moved away, it's gotten a little ridiculous. "Merry Christmas! [...]
Sat, Oct 21, 2017
Source: Sewing-B
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
news was published by Prnewswire.com which published an article titled: “Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines ... [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News
“Global Sewing Machines Industry” on March 11, 2014. PEGASUS SEWING MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD. is a Japan firm mainly engaged in the manufacture and sale of industrial sewing machines and die-casting parts. The company has market cap of $19.32 billio [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source: Industry News

Cotton label requirements

If you advertise or sell clothing or household items containing cotton, the product labels must reflect the fabric content accurately. So say the Textile Act and Rules, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission. The Textile Act and Rules cover fibers, yarns and fabrics, and household textile products made from them, like clothing and accessories, draperies, floor coverings, furnishings and beddings. If the item contains wool, the Wool Act and Rules apply instead of the Textile Act and Rules.

This article explains what information must be included on labels and in written advertisements if you mention the presence of specific kinds of cotton in textile products.

Fiber Content Statement

Any product covered by the Textile Act and Rules must include a fiber content statement that lists:

  • the generic name of each fiber that equals 5% or more of the product’s weight, in order of predominance, and the percentage of the product’s weight represented by each fiber.

For example: “85% Cotton, 15% Polyester.”

Fibers that are less than 5% of the weight should be listed as “other fiber[s]”. Fibers that have functional significance, even in small amounts, may be listed by name.

For example: “96% Cotton, 4% Spandex.”

A product should not be labeled “100% Cotton” unless it contains only cotton (or only cotton with some non-cotton “trim”). For more information about textile labeling requirements, see Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts.

The fiber content statement may include the name of a type of cotton, the cotton trademark or a term that implies the presence of a type of cotton. The statement must be truthful and not deceptive. If you use a cotton name, trademark, or other term that implies the presence of a type of cotton, you must use the generic fiber name “cotton” with it.

For example, “100% Sea Island Cotton,” “50% Pima Cotton, 50% Upland Cotton,” “85% Egyptian Cotton, 15% Silk.”

You must use type of the same size and conspicuousness for the required fiber content information. The type must be reasonably easy to read. For example, “50% EGYPTIAN COTTON, 50% OTHER COTTON” is permissible; “50% EGYPTIAN COTTON, 50% other cotton” is not. If your product contains more than one kind of cotton, the fiber content statement doesn’t have to specify the name and percentage of each cotton type.

For example, the product may be labeled “All Cotton” or “100% Cotton.”

If the label of a product made from various kinds of cotton names a cotton type, it must give the cotton’s percentage by weight and make clear that other types of cotton also were used to make the product.

For example, a sheet that contains 65% Pima Cotton and 35% Upland Cotton may be labeled “100% Cotton,” “100% Cotton (65% Pima Cotton),” “65% Pima Cotton, 35% Upland Cotton,” or “65% Pima Cotton, 35% Other Cotton.”

If your product contains more than one kind of cotton, a content statement that claims the product is made of only one type of cotton is not acceptable.

For example, when a sheet contains 50% Egyptian Cotton and 50% Upland Cotton, a fiber content label that reads, “100% Egyptian Cotton,” is unacceptable.

Use of a Trademark

A fiber trademark or other term must not be used to imply the presence of a fiber that’s not actually in the product.

For example, a trademark like “Pimalux” (a fictitious trademark) can’t be used if the textile product doesn’t contain pima cotton.

A trademark or other term that implies that a product is wholly made of one kind of cotton may not be used when the product is made of more than one kind of cotton, or when it contains fibers other than cotton.

For example, “Pimalux Towel – 100% Cotton” would not be an acceptable disclosure for a product made of 50% Pima Cotton, 50% Upland Cotton because the statement falsely implies that all the cotton in the towel is pima cotton. An acceptable fiber content statement for this product would be “Pimalux Towel – 50% Pima Cotton, 50% Upland Cotton.”

Towels

If both loops and ground of a towel are cotton, manufacturers may still want to distinguish between the fiber of the loops and the fiber of the ground, especially if the loops are made of a premium cotton like Pima.

For example, a label saying “100% Cotton, 100% Pima Cotton Loops” or “100% Cotton, Pima Cotton Loops” is acceptable, assuming the statement is truthful. A label saying “100% Pima Cotton” or simply “Pima Cotton” would not be acceptable if only the loops were Pima and the ground was another kind of cotton.

If the loops and the ground of a towel are not the same generic fiber, the label must take into account the fiber weight of each.

For example, if the loops are cotton and the ground is polyester and each comprises 50% of the weight, the label could say “50% Cotton, 50% Polyester.”

If the manufacturer wants to show the fiber of the loops separately, the label should disclose: “100% Cotton loops, 100% Polyester ground (loops 50% of fabric, ground 50%).”

A label reflecting only the content of the pile or the back is not acceptable.

For example, when towel loops are 100% Pima Cotton, and the base fabric is 100% Upland Cotton, a label that says only “100% Pima Cotton” or “100% Pima Cotton Loops” is unacceptable.

Including non-required information

Some information is considered non-required. For example, any reference to a type of cotton that isn’t part of the required fiber content statement, but appears on the same label, is non-required information. Non-required information must not:

  • interfere with, minimize, detract from or conflict with the required information and
  • be false or deceptive as to fiber content.

For example, if the required fiber content statement says “70% Pima Cotton, 30% Upland Cotton,” the non-required phrase “Pimalux Towel” must not interfere or detract from it, or be false or deceptive by, for example, falsely implying that the towel is 100% Pima Cotton.

If an item has a label that includes the required fiber content statement, its hang-tag may identify and describe one or more fibers. The item’s hang-tag doesn’t have to include the full fiber content statement if it:

  • tells consumers to see the label for the full fiber content, or
  • states that it doesn’t disclose the product’s full fiber content.

The disclosures aren’t required on a hang-tag that identifies the only fiber in an item. However, the label disclosing the full fiber content for such an item must state that the product is “All” or “100%” of the fiber, as required by the Rules. The fiber content information on a hang-tag must not be false or deceptive.

Read more about hang-tag disclosures.

Items containing wool

If the item also contains wool, the same labeling requirements apply, with these exceptions:

  • the wool content must be identified even if the wool accounts for less than 5%
  • the fibers don’t need to be listed in descending order of predominance

Written Advertisements

An ad doesn’t have to mention a product’s fiber content or include the name of a particular kind of cotton, cotton trademark or other term implying the presence of a type of cotton. But if it does, it must include the required fiber content information with fibers listed in order of predominance by weight. The percentages of fibers don’t have to be included.

For example, “Fine Pima Blend Fabric (Pima Cotton, Upland Cotton)” is permissible in an ad for a product whose label reads “90% Pima Cotton, 10% Upland Cotton.” “Pimalux Towel (Pima Cotton, Upland Cotton)” is permissible in an ad for a towel whose label reads “70% Pima Cotton, 30% Upland Cotton.”

All required fiber information must appear together in the ad in type of the same size and conspicuousness and that is reasonably easy to read.

Any reference in an ad to fiber content, including the name of a particular kind of cotton, a cotton trademark or other term implying the presence of a type of cotton, must not be false, deceptive or misleading as to fiber content.

If your ad uses the name of a particular type of cotton, a cotton trademark or other term implying the presence of a type of cotton, include that information on the product’s content label.

For more information

See Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts and Clothes Captioning for more about textile labeling requirements and care labels.

Your Opportunity to Comment

The National Small Business Ombudsman and 10 Regional Fairness Boards collect comments from small businesses about federal compliance and enforcement activities. Each year, the Ombudsman evaluates the conduct of these activities and rates each agency’s responsiveness to small businesses. Small businesses can comment to the Ombudsman without fear of reprisal. To comment, go to www.sba.gov/ombudsman.

July 2014

https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/calling-it-cotton-labeling-advertising-cotton-products

FTC label definitions

Appendix A to Part 423 — Glossary of Standard Terms

Authority: 38 Stat. 717, as amended; (15 U.S.C. 41, et seq.)

Source: 48 FR 22743, May 20, 1983; 48 FR 24869, June 3, 1983, unless otherwise noted.

423.1 Definitions.

(a) Care label means a permanent label or tag, containing regular care information and instructions, that is attached or affixed in such a manner that it will not become separated from the product and will remain legible during the useful life of the product.

(b) Certain Piece Goods means textile products sold by the piece from bolts or rolls for the purpose of making home sewn textile wearing apparel. This includes remnants, the fiber content of which is known, that are cut by or for a retailer but does not include manufacturers’ remnants, up to ten yards long, that are clearly and conspicuously marked pound goods or fabrics of undetermined origin (i.e., fiber content is not known and cannot be easily ascertained) and trim, up to five inches wide.

(c) Dryclean means a commercial process by which soil is removed from products or specimens in a machine which uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also include adding moisture to the solvent, up to 75% relative humidity, hot tumble drying up to 160 degrees F (71 degrees C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing.

(d) Machine Wash means a process by which soil is removed from products in a specially designed machine using water, detergent or soap and agitation. When no temperature is given, e.g., warm or cold, hot water up to 145 degrees F (63 degrees C) can be regularly used.

(e) Regular Care means customary and routine care, not spot care.

(f) Textile Product means any commodity, woven, knit or otherwise made primarily of fiber, yarn or fabric and intended for sale or resale, requiring care and maintenance to effectuate ordinary use and enjoyment.

(g) Textile Wearing Apparel means any finished garment or article of clothing made from a textile product that is customarily used to cover or protect any part of the body, including hosiery, excluding footwear, gloves, hats or other articles used exclusively to cover or protect the head or hands.

423.2 Terminology.

(a) Any appropriate terms may be used on care labels or care instructions so long as they clearly and accurately describe regular care procedures and otherwise fulfill the requirements of this regulation.

(b) Any appropriate symbols may be used on care labels or care instructions, in addition to the required appropriate terms so long as the terms fulfill the requirements of this regulation. See § 423.8(g) for conditional exemption allowing the use of symbols without terms.

(c) The terminology set forth in Appendix A may be used to fulfill the requirements of this regulation.

423.3 What this regulation does.

This regulation requires manufacturers and importers of textile wearing apparel and certain piece goods, in or affecting commerce, as “commerce” is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, to provide regular care instructions at the time such products are sold to purchasers through the use of care labels or other methods described in this rule.

423.4 Who is covered.

Manufacturers and importers of textile wearing apparel and certain piece goods are covered by this regulation. This includes any person or organization that directs or controls the manufacture or importation of covered products.

423.5 Unfair or deceptive acts or practices.

(a) Textile wearing apparel and certain piece goods. In connection with the sale, in or affecting commerce, of textile wearing apparel and certain piece goods, it is an unfair or deceptive act or practice for a manufacturer or importer:

(1) To fail to disclose to a purchaser, prior to sale, instructions which prescribe a regular care procedure necessary for the ordinary use and enjoyment of the product;

(2) To fail to warn a purchaser, prior to sale, when the product cannot be cleaned by any cleaning procedure, without being harmed;

(3) To fail to warn a purchaser, prior to sale, when any part of the prescribed regular care procedure, which a consumer or professional cleaner could reasonably be expected to use, would harm the product or others being cleaned with it;

(4) To fail to provide regular care instructions and warnings, except as to piece goods, in a form that can be referred to by the consumer throughout the useful life of the product;

(5) To fail to possess, prior to sale, a reasonable basis for all regular care information disclosed to the purchaser.

(b) Violations of this regulation. The Commission has adopted this regulation to prevent the unfair or deceptive acts or practices, defined in paragraph (a) of this Section. Each manufacturer or importer covered by this regulation must comply with the requirements in 423.2 and 423.6 through 423.8 of this regulation. Any manufacturer or importer who complies with the requirements of 423.2 and 423.6 through 423.8 does not violate this regulation.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 3084 – 0046)

423.6 Textile wearing apparel.

This section applies to textile wearing apparel.

(a) Manufacturers and importers must attach care labels so that they can be seen or easily found when the product is offered for sale to consumers. If the product is packaged, displayed, or folded so that customers cannot see or easily find the label, the care information must also appear on the outside of the package or on a hang tag fastened to the product.

(b) Care labels must state what regular care is needed for the ordinary use of the product. In general, labels for textile wearing apparel must have either a washing instruction or a drycleaning instruction. If a washing instruction is included, it must comply with the requirements set forth in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. If a drycleaning instruction is included, it must comply with the requirements set forth in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. If either washing or drycleaning can be used on the product, the label need have only one of these instructions. If the product cannot be cleaned by any available cleaning method without being harmed, the label must so state. [For example, if a product would be harmed both by washing and by drycleaning, the label might say “Do not wash — do not dryclean,” or “Cannot be successfully cleaned.”] The instructions for washing and drycleaning are as follows:

(1) Washing, drying, ironing, bleaching and warning instructions must follow these requirements:

(i) Washing. The label must state whether the product should be washed by hand or machine. The label must also state a water temperature – in terms such as cold, warm, or hot – that may be used. However, if the regular use of hot water up to 145 degrees F (63 degrees C) will not harm the product, the label need not mention any water temperature. [For example, Machine wash means hot, warm or cold water can be used.]

(ii) Drying. The label must state whether the product should be dried by machine or by some other method. If machine drying is called for, the label must also state a drying temperature that may be used. However, if the regular use of a high temperature will not harm the product, the label need not mention any drying temperature. [For example, “Tumble dry” means that a high, medium, or low temperature setting can be used.]

(iii) Ironing. Ironing must be mentioned on a label only if it will be needed on a regular basis to preserve the appearance of the product, or if it is required under paragraph (b)(1)(v) of this section, Warnings. If ironing is mentioned, the label must also state an ironing temperature that may be used. However, if the regular use of a hot iron will not harm the product, the label need not mention any ironing temperature.

(iv) Bleaching. (A) If all commercially available bleaches can safely be used on a regular basis, the label need not mention bleaching.

(B) If all commercially available bleaches would harm the product when used on a regular basis, the label must say “No bleach” or “Do not bleach.”

(C) If regular use of chlorine bleach would harm the product, but regular use of a non-chlorine bleach would not, the label must say “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed.”

(v) Warnings. (A) If there is any part of the prescribed washing procedure which consumers can reasonably be expected to use that would harm the product or others being washed with it in one or more washings, the label must contain a warning to this effect. The warning must use words “Do not,” “No,” “Only,” or some other clear wording. [For example, if a shirt is not colorfast, its label should state “Wash with like colors” or “Wash separately.” If a pair of pants will be harmed by ironing, its label should state “Do not iron.”]

(B) Warnings are not necessary for any procedure that is an alternative to the procedure prescribed on the label. [For example, if an instruction states “Dry flat,” it is not necessary to give the warning “Do not tumble dry.”]

(2) Drycleaning. — (i) General. If a drycleaning instruction is included on the label, it must also state at least one type of solvent that may be used. However, if all commercially available types of solvent can be used, the label need not mention any types of solvent. The terms “Drycleanable” or “Commercially Dryclean” may not be used in an instruction. [For example, if drycleaning in perchlorethylene would harm a coat, the label might say “Professionally dryclean: fluorocarbon or petroleum.”]

(ii) Warnings. (A) If there is any part of the drycleaning procedure which consumers or drycleaners can reasonably be expected to use that would harm the product or others being cleaned with it, the label must contain a warning to this effect. The warning must use the words “Do not,” “No,” “Only,” or some other clear wording. [For example, the drycleaning process normally includes moisture addition to solvent up to 75% relative humidity, hot tumble drying up to 160 degrees F and restoration by steam press or steam-air finish. If a product can be drycleaned in all solvents but steam should not be used, its label should state “Professionally dryclean. No steam.”]

(B) Warnings are not necessary to any procedure which is an alternative to the procedure prescribed on the label. [For example, if an instruction states “Professionally dryclean, fluorocarbon,” it is not necessary to give the warning “Do not use perchlorethylene.”]

(c) A manufacturer or importer must establish a reasonable basis for care information by possessing prior to sale:

(1) Reliable evidence that the product was not harmed when cleaned reasonably often according to the instructions on the label, including instructions when silence has a meaning. [For example, if a shirt is labeled “Machine wash. Tumble dry. Cool iron.,” the manufacturer or importer must have reliable proof that the shirt is not harmed when cleaned by machine washing (in hot water), with any type of bleach, tumble dried (at a high setting), and ironed with a cool iron]; or

(2) Reliable evidence that the product or a fair sample of the product was harmed when cleaned by methods warned against on the label. However, the manufacturer or importer need not have proof of harm when silence does not constitute a warning. [For example, if a shirt is labeled “Machine wash warm. Tumble dry medium”, the manufacturer need not have proof that the shirt would be harmed if washed in hot water or dried on high setting]; or

(3) Reliable evidence, like that described in paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, for each component part of the product in conjunction with reliable evidence for the garment as a whole; or

(4) Reliable evidence that the product or a fair sample of the product was successfully tested. The tests may simulate the care suggested or warned against on the label; or

(5) Reliable evidence of current technical literature, past experience, or the industry expertise supporting the care information on the label; or

(6) Other reliable evidence.

423.7 Certain piece goods.

This section applies to certain piece goods.

(a) Manufacturers and importers of certain piece goods must provide care information clearly and conspicuously on the end of each bolt or roll.

(b) Care information must say what regular care is needed for the ordinary use of the product, pursuant to the instructions set forth in 423.6. Care information on the end of the bolt need only address information applicable to the fabric.

423.8 Exemptions.

(a) Any item of textile wearing apparel, without pockets, that is totally reversible (i.e., the product is designed to be used with either side as the outer part or face) is exempt from the care label requirement.

(b) Manufacturers or importers can ask for an exemption from the care label requirement for any other textile wearing apparel product or product line, if the label would harm the appearance or usefulness of the product. The request must be made in writing to the Secretary of the Commission. The request must be accompanied by a labeled sample of the product and a full statement explaining why the request should be granted.

(c) If an item is exempt from care labeling under paragraph (a) or (b), of this section the consumers still must be given the required care information for the product. However, the care information can be put on a hang tag, on the package, or in some other conspicuous place, so that consumers will be able to see the care information before buying the product.

(d) Manufacturers and importers of products covered by 423.5 are exempt from the requirement for a permanent care label if the product can be cleaned safely under the harshest procedures. This exemption is available only if there is reliable proof that all of the following washing and drycleaning procedures can safely be used on a product:

(1) Machine washing in hot water;

(2) Machine drying at a high setting;

(3) Ironing at a hot setting;

(4) Bleaching with all commercially available bleaches;

(5) Drycleaning with all commercially available solvents. In such case, the statement “wash or dry clean, any normal method” must appear on a hang tag, on the package, or in some other conspicuous place, so that consumers will be able to see the statement before buying the product.

If a product meets the requirements outlined above, it is automatically exempt from the care label requirement. It is not necessary to file a request for this exemption.

(e) Manufacturers and importers need not provide care information with products sold to institutional buyers for commercial use.

(f) All exemption granted under 423.1(c) (1) or (2) or the Care Labeling Rule issued on December 9, 1971, will continue to be in effect if the product still meets the standards on which the original exemption was based. Otherwise, the exemption is automatically revoked.

(g) The symbol system developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and designated as ASTM Standard D5489-96c, Standard Guide for Care Symbols for Care Instructions on Textile Products may be used on care labels or care instructions in lieu of terms so long as the symbols fulfill the requirements of this regulation. In addition, symbols from the symbol system designated as ASTM Standard D5489-96c may be combined with terms so long as the symbols and terms used fulfill the requirements of the regulation. Provided, however, that for the 18-month period following the effective date of this section, such symbols may be used on care labels in lieu of terms only if an explanation of the meaning of the symbols used on the care label in terms is attached to, or provided with, the item of textile wearing apparel. This incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ASTM Standard D5489-96c, Standard Guide for Care Symbols for Care Instructions on Textile Products may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428, or may be inspected at the Federal Trade Commission, room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC, or at the Office of the Federal Register, suite 700, 800 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC.

423.9 Conflict with flammability standards.

If there is a conflict between this regulation and any regulations issued under the Flammable Fabrics Act, the Flammable Fabics regulation govern over this one.

423.10 Stayed or invalid parts.

If any part of this regulation is stayed or held invalid, the rest of it will stay in force.

16 CFR Part 423, Appendix A

Glossary of Standard Terms

1. Washing, Machine Methods:

a. “Machine wash” – a process by which soil may be removed from products or specimens through the use of water, detergent or soap, agitation, and a machine designed for this purpose. When no temperature is given, e.g., “warm” or “cold,” hot water up to 145 degrees F (63 degrees C) can be regularly used.

b. “Hot” – initial water temperature ranging from 112 to 145 degrees F [45 to 63 degrees C].

c. “Warm” – initial water temperature ranging from 87 to 111 degrees F [31 to 44 degrees C].

d. “Cold” – initial water temperature up to 86 degrees F [30 degrees C].

e. “Do not have commercially laundered” — do not employ a laundry which uses special formulations, sour rinses, extremely large loads or extremely high temperatures or which otherwise is employed for commercial, industrial or institutional use. Employ laundering methods designed for residential use or use in a self-service establishment.

f. “Small load” — smaller than normal washing load.

g. “Delicate cycle” or “gentle cycle” — slow agitation and reduced time.

h. “Durable press cycle” or “permanent press cycle” — cool down rinse or cold rinse before reduced spinning.

i. “Separately” — alone.

j. “With like colors” — with colors of similar hue and intensity.

k. “Wash inside out” — turn product inside out to protect face of fabric.

l. “Warm rinse” — initial water temperature setting 90 to 110 F (32 to 43 C).

m. “Cold rinse” — initial water temperature setting same as cold water tap up to 85 F (29 C).

n. “Rinse thoroughly” — rinse several times to remove detergent, soap, and bleach.

o. “No spin” or “Do not spin” — remove material start of final spin cycle.

p. “No wring” or “Do not wring” — do not use roller wringer, nor wring by hand.

2. Washing, Hand Methods:

a. “Hand wash” — a process by which soil may be manually removed from products or specimens through the use of water, detergent or soap, and gentle squeezing action. When no temperature is given, e.g., “warm” or “cold”, hot water up to 150 F (66 C) can be regularly used.

b. “Warm” — initial water temperature 90 to 110 F (32 to 43 C) (hand comfortable).

c. “Cold” — initial water temperature same as cold water tap up to 85 F (29 C).

d. “Separately” — alone.

e. “With like colors” — with colors of similar hue and intensity.

f. “No wring or twist” — handle to avoid wrinkles and distortion.

g. “Rinse thoroughly” — rinse several times to remove detergent, soap, and bleach.

h. “Damp wipe only” — surface clean with damp cloth or sponge.

3. Drying, All Methods:

a. “Tumble dry” — use machine dryer. When no temperature setting is given, machine drying at a hot setting may be regularly used.

b. “Medium” — set dryer at medium heat.

c. “Low” — set dryer at low heat.

d. “Durable press” or “Permanent press” — set dryer at permanent press setting.

e. “No heat” — set dryer to operate without heat.

f. “Remove promptly” — when items are dry, remove immediately to prevent wrinkling.

g. “Drip dry” — hang dripping wet with or without hand shaping and smoothing.

h. “Line dry” — hang damp from line or bar in or out of doors.

i. “Line dry in shade” — dry away from sun.

j. “Line dry away from heat” — dry away from heat.

k. “Dry flat” — lay out horizontally for drying.

l. “Block to dry” — reshape to original dimensions while drying.

m. “Smooth by hand” — by hand, while wet, remove wrinkles, straighten seams and facings.

4. Ironing and Pressing:

a. “Iron” — Ironing is needed. When no temperature is given iron at the highest temperature setting may be regularly used.

b. “Warm iron” — medium temperature setting.

c. “Cool iron” — lowest temperature setting.

d. “Do not iron” — item not to be smoothed or finished with an iron.

e. “Iron wrong side only” — article turned inside out for ironing or pressing.

f. “No steam” or “Do not steam” — steam in any form not to be used.

g. “Steam only” — steaming without contact pressure.

h. “Steam press” or “Steam iron” — use iron at steam setting.

i. “Iron damp” — articles to be ironed should feel moist.

j. “Use press cloth” — use a dry or a damp cloth between iron and fabric.

5. Bleaching:

a. “Bleach when needed” — all bleaches may be used when necessary.

b. “No bleach” or “Do not bleach” — no bleaches may be used.

c. “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed” — only the bleach specified may be used when necessary. Chlorine bleach may not be used.

6. Washing or Drycleaning:

a. “Wash or dryclean, any normal method” — can be machine washed in hot water, can be machine dried at a high setting, can be ironed at a hot setting, can be bleached with all commercially available bleaches and can be drycleaned with all commercially available solvents.

7. Drycleaning, All Procedures:

a. “Dryclean” — a process by which soil may be removed from products or specimens in a machine which uses any common organic solvent (for example, petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon) located in any commercial establishment. The process may include moisture addition to solvent up to 75% relative humidity, hot tumble drying up to 160 F (71 C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing.

b. “Professionally dryclean” — use the drycleaning process but modified to ensure optimum results either by a drycleaning attendant or through the use of a drycleaning machine which permits such modifications or both. Such modifications or special warnings must be included in the care instruction.

c. “Petroleum”, “Fluorocarbon”, or “Perchlorethylene” — employ solvent(s) specified to dryclean the item.

d. “Short cycle” — reduced or minimum cleaning time, depending upon solvent used.

e. “Minimum extraction” — least possible extraction time.

f. “Reduced moisture” or “Low moisture” — decreased relative humidity.

g. “No tumble” or “Do not tumble” — do not tumble dry.

h. “Tumble warm” — tumble dry up to 120 F (49 C).

i. “Tumble cool” — tumble dry at room temperature.

j. “Cabinet dry warm” — cabinet dry up to 120 F (49 C).

k. “Cabinet dry cool” — cabinet dry at room temperature.

l. “Steam only” — employ no contact pressure when steaming.

m. “No steam” or “Do not steam” — do not use steam in pressing, finishing, steam cabinets or wands.

8. Leather and Suede Cleaning:

a. “Leather clean” — have cleaned only by a professional cleaner who uses special leather or suede care methods.

[48 FR 22743, May 20, 1983; 48 FR 24868, June 3, 1983; 48 FR 27225, June 14, 1983]

https://www.ftc.gov/enforcement/rules/rulemaking-regulatory-reform-proceedings/textile-products-identification-act-text

RIN Registered Identification Number Requirements

1) What is an RN Number?

RN stands for Registered Identification Number. It is a number issued by the FTC to U.S. businesses that manufacture, import, distribute, or sell products covered by the Textile, Wool, and Fur Acts. Businesses can use this number on product labels in lieu of the company name.

2) Do I have to use an RN number?

No. You are required to label covered products to show the name or identifying number of a business responsible for marketing the products in the United States or the manufacturer. Therefore, you may use your company business name on the label instead of an RN. The business name is the full name that appears on business documents, such as purchase orders and invoices. It is not a trademark, brand, or designer name (unless that is also the name under which the company conducts business). Alternatively, the goods may be labeled with the RN or business name of the company that is buying the goods from you – such as a distributor or retailer marketing them in the United States. If you are acquiring the finished products from an importer or distributor that markets them in the United States, or a manufacturer, they can remain labeled with the RN or business name of that company. RN numbers are available only to businesses residing in the United States. However, imported goods can be labeled with the name of the foreign exporter or distributor that markets them in the United States, or the manufacturer.

3) How do I get an RN number?

We encourage you to apply online. Commission staff will review the application and you will be notified by regular postal mail. As soon as the application has been approved, you can find your RN number in our RN Lookup Service. The number probably will be available online before you receive the mail notification. If you choose not to apply online, you can mail or fax your application to us. The form can be downloaded from this website. The mailing address is: Division of Enforcement, FTC, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20580. The fax number is 202-326-3197.

4) How long does it take to get an RN number?

It is faster if you apply online. We usually process online applications within 3 business days. A letter will be mailed to you shortly thereafter. If you apply by fax or regular mail, it can take 7-10 business days after we receive a properly completed application. We cannot offer one-day service or preferential treatment to any business – regardless of the situation.

5) Can you telephone or fax or email my number?

No. We mail you a letter via the U.S. Postal Service advising you of the number that has been issued. However, you can find your number on our website’s RN Lookup Service as soon as the application has been processed. You can search the RN database for your number by entering a key word of your company name.

6) How much does it cost?

There is no charge for this service.

7) My company is not in the U.S. What can I use instead of an RN number?

If you are the product’s manufacturer, or engage in the sale, offering for sale, distribution, or advertising of a textile product in the United States, the business name of your company can be used on the label. Alternatively, the goods can be labeled with the RN or business name of a company in the U.S. that is directly involved with importing, distributing, or selling the products.

8) Can I use my IRS number or a Canadian CA number instead of an RN number?

No. Neither your IRS number nor a Canadian CA number can substitute for a business name or RN on the label. However, the business name of a Canadian company responsible for marketing the products in the United States or a Canadian manufacturer on the label will satisfy the legal requirement.

9) Can I have more than one RN number?

No. We assign only one RN number per company.

10) What if my business moves after I obtain an RN number?

You are required to update the information in your application if there is any change in your business name, address, or legal business status. Your RN is subject to cancellation if you fail to do so. You can update this information online or by downloading and mailing or faxing the RN application form. You are also encouraged to update other information that may change, such as telephone number, e-mail address, products, or type of business.

11) What is a WPL number?

Many years ago, WPL numbers were issued by the FTC to companies manufacturing wool products subject to the Wool Products Labeling Act. We no longer issue WPL numbers, but many are still in use. They are used in the same manner as RN numbers.

12) Where can I get more information about RN numbers and the labeling of textile, wool and fur products?

We suggest that you review our business guide book, Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts.

Wedding Gowns Labels

Here come the bride-to-be and bridesmaids, shopping for the perfect dresses for the big day. They may look first at a gown’s style and price, but they’ll also check the manufacturer, fiber content, country of origin and care instructions.

Garment Labels

If you manufacture, import or sell wedding gowns and other bridal attire, you must ensure that consumers have certain garment information. The Textile Act, its regulations and the FTC’s Care Labeling Rule require that labels be attached to imported and domestic textile products like wedding gowns. These rules apply to sample garments and garments that are for sale. If the item contains wool, the Wool Act and its regulations apply instead of the Textile Act and its regulations.

Labels for wedding gowns and bridal attire must contain four key pieces of information:

1. The identity of any one of the businesses in the distribution channel:

  • the manufacturer
  • the manufacturer’s Registered Identification Number (RN), which is issued to companies in the U.S. and registered by the FTC
  • the retail store’s name or RN or
  • the RN or business name of any other company directly involved in the distribution of the gown.

The label showing the name or RN may be sewn in or attached to the garment as a hang-tag, and must be conspicuous.

2. The garment’s fiber content

If the garment doesn’t contain wool, you must list the generic fiber names and percentages (by weight) of each fiber used, in descending order of predominance. The label also should identify fibers that make up less than 5% of the item’s weight as “other fiber,” unless the fiber has a clearly established functional significance. List the percentage of “other fiber” last.

The label may be sewn in or attached to the garment as a hang-tag, and must be conspicuous. It may appear with other information or it may be a separate label. To ensure proper care of the garment, it may be important — although not required — to have the fiber content on a label that is permanently attached. You may attach additional hang-tags that identify some, but not all, the fibers, if the tags tell shoppers:

  • to check the label for full fiber content, or
  • that the hang-tag does not disclose the product’s full fiber content.

If the garment contains wool, the same requirements apply, except that:

  • the wool content must be identified even if the wool accounts for less than 5%;
  • the fibers don’t need to be listed in descending order of predominance.

3. The country of origin

Imported wedding attire must identify the country where it was processed or manufactured.

Garments made entirely in the U.S. of materials made in the U.S. must be labeled “Made in U.S.A.” or an equivalent phrase. Garments made in the U.S. of imported materials must be labeled to show the processing or manufacturing done in the U.S. and the imported component. Garments manufactured partly in the U.S. and partly abroad must identify both aspects.

If a garment is imported, the country-of-origin label must be sewn in to comply with U.S. Customs requirements. If an item is made in the U.S. of imported or domestic fabric, the country of origin information can be sewn in or placed on a hang-tag. The country-of-origin disclosure must be placed as close as possible to the center back of the neck. The country of origin of imported garments should be determined according to U.S. Customs regulations.

4. Care instructions

The care label must identify at least one safe cleaning method — either washing or drycleaning — and any necessary warnings about the cleaning method. For example, if the care instruction is to dryclean, the label must specify one type of solvent that may be used, unless all commercially available types of solvents can be used safely on the garment. If the garment is labeled for washing, the label must say whether any step of the normal washing process (washing, bleaching, drying or ironing) could harm it or other items cleaned with it.

The care label must be sewn in. Imported garments should have care labels when they are sent to the U.S., or the importer should attach them.

Tag Omission, Removal and Substitution

Wedding gowns and attire must have all the required labeling information when they leave the manufacturer.

Under the Textile and Wool Acts, it is illegal to remove a label containing manufacturer, fiber content or country-of-origin information without substituting another label with the required information. A retailer that wants to remove a label identifying the manufacturer must substitute a label that lists the shop’s own name or RN, or the name or RN of another business in the gown distribution chain. The substitute label must contain all the information that is required on the original label. All substitute labels must be properly attached to the garment, either sewn in or on a conspicuously placed hang-tag. Finally, a retailer must not remove the sewn-in care instructions.

Record Keeping

Manufacturers of wedding gowns and attire must keep records for three years that show the required label information for every garment they produce. The records should show that the letter of the law has been met and establish a traceable line from the raw materials to the finished product.

In addition, any business that substitutes a label on a textile product also must keep records for three years that show what information on the label was removed and the name of the party from whom the product was received.

Non-Compliance

Any violation of the Textile or Wool Act regulations or the Care Labeling Rule is considered an unfair and deceptive act or practice under the FTC Act. As a remedy, the Commission may issue an administrative order prohibiting the unlawful behavior. Violations of an administrative order can result in a federal district court action for civil penalties up to $16,000 each. Businesses not subject to a previous administrative order also can be subject to monetary civil penalties, an injunction and other remedies — including consumer redress — in a federal district court action for knowingly engaging in practices —like mislabeling garments — that the Commission has determined to be unfair or deceptive in prior cases.

For violations of the Care Labeling Rule by a manufacturer or importer, the Commission may seek an injunction in federal district court and civil penalties of up to $16,000 per violation. A retailer that removes care labels from garments may be held liable for unfair and deceptive acts or practices under the FTC Act and may be the subject of an administrative order. Violations of such orders can result in an action for civil penalties in federal district court.

Each instance of mislabeling under the textile laws and the Care Labeling Rule may be considered a separate violation.

For More Information

See Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts and Clothes Captioning for more about textile labeling requirements and care labels.

Your Opportunity to Comment

The National Small Business Ombudsman and 10 Regional Fairness Boards collect comments from small businesses about federal compliance and enforcement activities. Each year, the Ombudsman evaluates the conduct of these activities and rates each agency’s responsiveness to small businesses. Small businesses can comment to the Ombudsman without fear of reprisal. To comment, go to www.sba.gov/ombudsman.

July 2014

Textile and wool products must have a label

Federal law requires that most textile and wool products have a label that lists the fiber content, the country of origin, and the identity of the manufacturer or another business responsible for marketing or handling the product.

For fur, labels must disclose the animal name, the country of origin, information about the treatment of the item (for example, if it is bleached or colored), a Registered Identification Number, and other relevant information. The Fur Rules also set standards for the size and durability of the labels, the lettering, and the order in which information is presented.

The FTC’s Guides for Select Leather and Imitation Leather Products cover a wide range of items, including luggage, handbags, belts, footwear, and other apparel. Under the Care Labeling Rule, manufacturers and importers must provide instructions so consumers know how to clean the products they buy.

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/media-resources/tools-consumers/apparel-and-labeling

Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts

USA Care Labeling Rule

Care labels often are a deciding factor when consumers shop for clothing.

(1)
The Care Labeling Rule requires manufacturers and importers to attach care instructions to clothing and some piece goods.

Who’s Covered

  • manufacturers and importers of textile wearing apparel
  • manufacturers and importers of piece goods sold to consumers for making wearing apparel
  • any person or organization that directs or controls the manufacturing or importing of textile wearing apparel or piece goods for making wearing apparel

What’s Covered

  • Textile apparel worn to cover or protect the body
    • Exempt apparel: shoes, gloves and hats
    • Excluded items:
      • Handkerchiefs, belts, suspenders and neckties
      • Non-woven garments made for one-time use
  • Piece goods sold for making apparel at home
    • Exempt piece goods:
      • Marked manufacturers’ remnants of up to 10 yards when the fiber content is not known and cannot be determined easily
      • Trim up to five inches wide

Instructions and Warnings

Covered manufacturers and importers must:

  • provide complete instructions about regular care for the garment, or provide warnings if the garment cannot be cleaned without harm
  • ensure that, if followed, care labeling instructions will cause no substantial harm to the product; and
  • warn consumers about certain procedures that they may assume to be consistent with the instructions on the label, but that would harm the product. For example, if a pair of pants is labeled for washing, consumers may assume they can iron them. If the pants would be harmed by ironing, the label should read, “Do not iron.”

Reasonable Basis

You must have a reasonable basis for all care instructions and warnings — that is, reliable evidence to support the care instructions. For example, you can’t say “Dryclean Only” unless you have proof that washing will harm the garment.

Reliable evidence depends on several factors:

  • In some cases, experience and industry expertise serve as a reasonable basis.
  • In other cases — for example, if you use a dye that is known to bleed, or beads that are known to be damaged in drycleaning — you may need test results that show the garment can be cleaned as recommended without being damaged.
  • When a garment contains several components, you must have reliable evidence showing that the entire garment won’t be damaged when cleaned as directed. Results of tests on garment components can serve as a reasonable basis as long as you have reliable evidence supporting the care instructions for the garment as a whole. For example, testing the components of a garment is not an adequate basis for a “wash” instruction if the color of one part bleeds onto another when a consumer washes the finished garment.

When to Label Garments

  • Domestic manufacturers must attach care labels to finished products before they sell them.
  • Importers must ensure that care labels are attached to products before they sell them in the U.S., but care labels don’t have to be attached to products when they enter the U.S.

Labeling Clothing

  • Attach labels so consumers can easily see or find them at the point of sale.
  • If packaging gets in the way, place additional care information on the outside of the package or on a hang-tag attached to the product.
  • Labels must be attached permanently and securely.
  • Labels must be legible during the useful life of the product.
  • A garment with two or more parts that is sold as a unit needs only one care label if the care instructions are the same for all parts. Attach the label to the major piece of the suit. If the suit pieces require different care instructions or — like coordinates — are designed to be sold separately, each item must have its own care label.

Labeling Piece Goods

Manufacturers and importers must provide care information clearly and conspicuously on the end of each roll or bolt of fabric. The information should apply to the fabric on the roll or bolt, not to items the consumer might add to the fabric, like trim, lining or buttons.

Exemptions

These items don’t need permanent care labels, but must have conspicuous temporary labels at the point of sale:

  • Totally reversible clothing without pockets.
  • Products that may be washed, bleached, dried, ironed and drycleaned by the harshest procedures available, as long as the instruction “Wash or dryclean, any normal method,” appears on a temporary label.
  • Products that have been granted exemptions on grounds that care labels will harm their appearance or usefulness. Apply for this exemption in writing to the Secretary of the FTC. Your request must include a labeled sample of the product and a full statement explaining why the request should be granted.

These items don’t need care instructions:

  • Products sold to institutional buyers for commercial use; for example, uniforms sold to employers for employee use in job-related activities, but not bought by the employees.
  • Garments custom-made of material provided by the consumer.
  • Products granted exemptions under Section (c)(2) of the original rule because they were completely washable and sold at retail for $3 or less. If the product no longer meets this standard, the exemption is automatically revoked.

Violations

Failing to provide reliable care instructions and warnings for the useful life of an item is a violation of the FTC Act. Violators are subject to enforcement actions and penalties of up to $16,000 for each offense. In enforcement actions, the FTC contends that each mislabeled garment is a violation. Since 1990, the FTC has brought 16 enforcement actions; 15 were resolved by settlements and one was litigated. Penalties have ranged as high as $300,000.

Writing Care Instructions

Labels for clothing must have a washing or drycleaning instruction. If an item can be washed and drycleaned, the label needs only one of these instructions. Remember that consumers like having washing instructions for items that can be washed. If you prefer, give instructions for both washing and drycleaning.

Sometimes, because of the particular combination of components, a garment can’t be safely washed or drycleaned, but a manufacturer still wants to market it. The label on such a garment must say “Do not wash — Do not dryclean.”

We recommend, but don’t require, that you use the terms defined in the Rule’s Appendix A Glossary when they apply.

You may use the care symbols from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) designated as ASTM Standard D5489-96c Standard Guide for Care Symbols for Care Instructions on Textile Products, in place of words, but the symbols must fulfill the requirements of the Rule. These symbols are similar, but not identical, to the symbols designated as an international standard by the International Standards Organization (ISO) and used in many European countries.

Although only the ASTM symbols are approved for use in the United States, in September 2012 the Commission proposed amending the Rule to allow the use of the updated ASTM symbols in ASTM Standard D5489-07, and the ISO symbols in ISO Standard 3758:2005(E).

Washing Instructions: Five Elements

One: Washing by hand or by machine

The label must say whether the product should be washed by hand or machine, and give a water temperature setting if regular use of hot water will harm the product.

Two: Bleaching

If all commercially available bleaches can be used on a regular basis without harming the product, the label doesn’t have to mention bleach.

If using chlorine bleach on a regular basis will harm the product, but using non-chlorine bleach on a regular basis won’t, the label must say, “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed.”

If all commercially available bleaches would harm the product when used on a regular basis, the label must say, “No bleach” or “Do not bleach.”

Three: Drying

The label must say whether the product should be dried by machine or another method. Unless regular use of high temperature will harm the product when machine dried, it’s not necessary to indicate a temperature setting.

Four: Ironing

If a product needs repeated ironing, the care label must give ironing information. If regular use of a hot iron won’t harm a product, it’s not necessary to indicate a temperature setting.

Five: Warnings

If you have a reasonable expectation that a consumer could use a care procedure that will harm the product, the label must contain a warning like “Do not,” “No,” or “Only,” to warn against the harmful procedure. For example, if a garment will be harmed by ironing, and you expect a consumer could occasionally “touch up” the garment, the label should state, “Do not iron.”

If a care procedure on one product could harm another product that is washed with it, the label must include a warning. For example, if an item is not colorfast, the label must say “Wash with like colors” or “Wash separately.”

Warnings aren’t necessary for alternative procedures that could be harmful. For example, if the instructions state “Dry flat,” it’s not necessary to state “Do not tumble dry.”

Drycleaning Instructions

You may use a simple “dryclean” instruction under two conditions:

  • If all commercially available types of solvent can be used, the label doesn’t have to mention any particular type. But if any solvents would harm the product, you must mention a safe solvent. For example, “Dryclean, petroleum solvent.”
  • If the drycleaning process, as defined in the Rule, can be used on the garment with no modifications, you may use a simple “dryclean.”

If any part of the drycleaning process would harm the product, the “dryclean” instruction must include a warning to avoid or modify that part of the process. The label must use “Do not,” “No,” “Only,” or other clear wording. For example, if steam would damage a garment, the label should say “Dryclean. No steam.”

If the normal drycleaning process must be modified the label may say, “Professionally dryclean. No steam.” The label should not use “Professionally dryclean” if there’s no need to modify the normal drycleaning process. By itself, “Professionally dryclean” is not an adequate instruction. The label should use “Professionally dryclean” only with instructions for modifying the process; for example, “Professionally dryclean. No steam.”

Remember that “Dryclean Only” warns that the garment can’t be washed. For any warning on the label, you must have evidence that the process warned against will damage the garment. Garments may be labeled “Dryclean Only” only if you have evidence that washing will damage the garment.

FAQs

Label Location

Q. May care instructions be on the back of another permanent label sewn into the garment?

A. You can put care information on the reverse side of a permanent label if only one end of the permanent label is sewn into the garment and the consumer has easy access to the front and back of the label. The front of the label doesn’t have to say “Care on reverse.”

Q. Does each piece of an ensemble, suit or other multi-piece garment need a care label?

A. A garment that has two parts or more and is always sold as a unit needs only one care label if the care instructions are the same for all the pieces. The label should be attached to the major piece of the suit. If the suit pieces require different care instructions or are designed to be sold separately, each item must have its own care label.

Q. May care instructions be printed directly on the product?

A. Yes, if the instructions meet the Rule’s requirements of permanence and legibility.

Q. May care instructions be printed on the “fiber content” label?

A. Yes, if the instructions meet the Rule’s requirements of permanence and legibility.

Label Content

Q. What’s the minimum washing instruction that can appear on a care label?

A. A minimum washing instruction would include a method of washing and a method of drying, like “Machine wash. Tumble dry.” This minimal wording means:

  • the product can be machine washed and tumble dried at any temperature
  • ironing isn’t necessary
  • any type of bleach can be used and
  • no warnings are required.

All elements of a proper washing instruction — washing, drying, ironing, bleaching and warnings — must be considered.

Q. Generally, when wash-and-wear garments are removed promptly from the dryer, they don’t need ironing. But if garments aren’t removed promptly, they might wrinkle and require some pressing with a cool iron. Does a care instruction have to address this?

A. Yes. The Rule requires ironing instructions if ironing is needed on a regular basis to preserve the product’s appearance, or as a special warning when you expect a consumer to use an iron and a hot iron would harm the product. In these cases, the instruction could read “Cool iron, if needed.”

Q. Is it proper if the bleach portion of a washing instruction says “Do not use chlorine bleach”?

A. No. A care label that says only “Do not use chlorine bleach” is unacceptable. If using chlorine bleach frequently would harm the product, but using non-chlorine bleach would not, the label must say, “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed.” This instruction warns consumers that chlorine bleach isn’t safe for regular use, but non-chlorine bleach is. For clarity, the care label may say “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed. Do not use chlorine bleach.”

Q. Does the Rule permit a care label that says “Wash in warm water. Block to dry. Do not use bleach.”?

A. No. This instruction is not complete. The Rule requires washing instructions to state whether the product should be washed by hand or machine.

Q. Does a care instruction have to consider components like linings, trim, buttons or zippers?

A. Yes. Care instructions must include all components of the product, including non-detachable linings, trim and other details. The instructions should contain any special considerations for components as a warning; for example, “Remove trim,” or “Close zipper.” A detachable component, like a slip-out liner, must be labeled separately if it requires a different care procedure than the main product.

Q. When may “Dryclean only” be used?

A. “Dryclean only” may be used when the garment can be drycleaned safely by the normal process, using any drycleaning solvent. The instruction indicates that the garment can’t be safely washed. When you use “Dryclean only,” you must have a reasonable basis for both the drycleaning instruction and the warning against washing.

Q. Is the single word “Dryclean” a sufficient care instruction?

A. Yes. A drycleaning instruction generally must include a type of solvent that can be used safely (say, perchlorethylene or petroleum); if any type of commercially available solvent can be used, it’s not necessary to name a type of solvent. A care instruction with only the word “Dryclean” means any solvent may be used safely in a process that includes machine cleaning, moisture addition to solvent of up to 75% relative humidity, hot tumble drying up to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing.

Q. When should “Professionally dryclean” be used?

A. Use “Professionally dryclean” when the normal drycleaning process must be modified to dryclean the product safely. “Professionally dryclean” is not an adequate instruction by itself. It must be accompanied by the modification(s) necessary to make the drycleaning process safe. For example, “Professionally dryclean, reduce moisture, short cycle, tumble warm, no steam” would mean any commercially available solvent could be used, the moisture addition to the solvent should be reduced, the cleaning time should be reduced, the warm setting should be used for tumble drying, and steam should not be used in pressing or finishing.

Care Symbols

Q. Must symbols be used?

A. No. Symbols are optional as long as care instructions are on the label. If you choose to use symbols without words, you might want to include information about the meaning of the symbols — perhaps on a hangtag or in your catalogue — to be sure your customers understand them.

Q. May the system of symbols used in Europe and designated as an international standard by the International Standards Organization (ISO) be used?

A. No. The symbols you use must be those developed by the ASTM and designated as ASTM Standard D5489-96c. In September 2012, the Commission proposed amending the Rule to allow the use of the symbols in ASTM Standard D5489-07, and the ISO symbols in ISO Standard 3758:2005(E).

Labeling Piece Goods

Q. What does “certain piece goods” mean?

A. Under the Rule, “certain piece goods” are fabrics sold at retail on a piece-by-piece basis from bolts, pieces or rolls for use in home sewing of textile wearing apparel. The term “fabric” means any material woven, knitted, felted or otherwise produced from, or in combination with, any natural or manufactured fiber, yarn or substitute.

Two categories of piece goods are excluded from the Rule:

  • trim up to 5 inches wide, like ribbon, lace, rick-rack, tape, belting, binding or braid and
  • manufacturer’s remnants up to 10 yards long when the remnants are clearly and conspicuously marked as “pound goods” or “fabric of undetermined origin,” and the fiber content of the remnants is unknown and can’t be readily determined.

If a remnant’s fiber content is known, it’s not excluded from the Rule. Remnants created at the retail level, or by the manufacturer at the retailer’s request aren’t excluded either.

Q. Manufacturers and importers must put care information for piece goods “on the end of each bolt or roll.” Is there any specific location for this information?

A. Place care information on:

  • the selvage of the material
  • the end of the “board” on which the goods are wound a tag attached to the selvage or the “board end” or
  • on any other position at the end of the roll where a consumer can find and read it easily

If a tag is used, it should be attached so that it won’t separate from the bolt until the last piece is sold.

Exemptions to the Rule

Q. The Rule exempts products sold to institutional buyers for commercial use. Are rental service companies exempt as well?

A. Yes. In addition to rental service companies, institutional buyers include hospitals, nursing homes, colleges and universities, local, state, and federal institutions, hotels, motels and other bulk purchasers of uniforms and employee work clothes.

Q. Is there any exemption that applies to an entire product line?

A. Yes. Hosiery products, including stockings, anklets, waist-high tights, panty hose and leg warmers, are exempt. Hosiery items don’t need a permanent care label, but they must have care instructions on a hang tag, on the package or in another conspicuous place. This includes sheer hosiery of 50 denier or less. Hosiery that retails for $3 or less and that can be washed and dried at hot settings without damage doesn’t need a label.

Drycleaners

Q. Must a drycleaner clean a garment according to the instructions on the care label?

A. No, but using a care method not specified on a care label may be risky. Clothing labeled as washable may not dryclean satisfactorily. Many local drycleaners have facilities for properly washing and finishing washable garments, but customers who ask for a method of cleaning not listed on the care label may be asked to sign a consent form explaining that the drycleaner and the customer have discussed the potential risks of cleaning the garment. With or without the consent form, when drycleaners accept garments for cleaning, they are obligated to clean garments professionally, to the best of their ability.

“Professionally Wetclean”

Q. Does a care label that states “Professionally wetclean” comply with the Care Labeling Rule?

A. No. The subject was of considerable interest during the last amendment proceedings, and is discussed at length in the Care Labeling Rule Statement of Basis and Purpose. In September 2012, the Commission proposed amending the Rule to allow a wetcleaning instruction for items that can be professionally wetcleaned.

Your Opportunity to Comment

The National Small Business Ombudsman and 10 Regional Fairness Boards collect comments from small businesses about federal compliance and enforcement activities. Each year, the Ombudsman evaluates the conduct of these activities and rates each agency’s responsiveness to small businesses. Small businesses can comment to the Ombudsman without fear of reprisal. To comment, go to www.sba.gov/ombudsman.

May 2014

(1) https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/clothes-captioning-complying-care-labeling-rule